I'd like to model the western US

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Several years ago I downloaded the hourly generation data from CAISO. The hourly generation data is broken down between wind, solar, geothermal, gas, nuclear and hydro. I got a hair up my ass one day and figured to play with the data. My original intention was to graph these resources using day by day snapshots that color production from each resource. I just wanted to see what the data looked like. Seeing the data made me itch. I immediately moved to extrapolating extra solar/wind and graphing these alternate realities. To do this you need to write some simple code that balances down the thermal generation when the wind/solar grows. But then you think... The hydro would move too right. Within 12 hours I had a skeleton program that was "planning" how the grid could work.

So fast forward three months and I had program that thought through how different balancing scenarios could work. It was a fun exercise but I ultimately ran out of data and gumption. I figured... Well... Couple years forward and well have the data from all the other balancing areas maybe I can take another shot at modeling a wider grid area.

So yeah... The DOE's 930 data came along which is extremely helpful and then this Physical Solar Model comes along which should be extremely helpful except no one here responds to emails.

Here's how you model the grid. You build a list of counties and their populations. That's a vertical row across the top. Next you figure out the average temperature in each county for every hour of the year. Next you prorate the System Load against the weighted temperature average of the population group. This load forecasting methodology works extremely well - 1 or 2% error.

I want to do this modelling for the Western US. Why won't you guys work with me?

My mistake. Horizontal row.

Here's how you model the grid. You build a list of counties and their populations. That's a vertical row across the top. Next you figure out the average temperature in each county for every hour of the year. Next you prorate the System Load against the weighted temperature average of the population group. This load forecasting methodology works extremely well http://todayedu.online